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7 Apps to Make Everyday Life More Accessible

Mobile apps for accessibility

With today’s technology, there are so many apps that help make our lives easier. With this in mind, we wanted to find out what apps young people with intellectual disabilities find the most useful when it comes to navigating the world around them. To find out what apps people liked we reached out to you our supporters for any apps that you find useful in daily life as well as some independent research. Here are seven apps that promote safety and accessibility while young people begin to gain more independence and venture out into the world!

  1. TFI Journey Planner

TFI Journey Planner is a journey planner that provides service information, directions and estimated times for taking a journey on licensed public transport across Ireland. This allows people to plan out their routes from their front door right up until their final destination. You can also save specific routes to your profile and rename them whatever you’d like. It will be most useful for daily commutes like travelling to and from work!

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2. Grace 4

Grace 4 is a great tool for young people who have difficulty in verbal communication. It stores booklets of pictures and vocabulary that people can use when they are trying to communicate and are struggling to get their message across. The app allows people to have all these images and vocabulary portable for their daily lives. Users can also personalise the app by taking pictures and adding them into their file that they cannot seem to find on the app.

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3. WaytoB

WaytoB is an app developed by a Trinity College student for people with intellectual disabilities. The app is to support people with ID to travel independently. The app assists people with ID to get from A to B alone by providing a safe platform that will show them the safest routes and directions to travel. The app can be linked with a partner who will get live updates on their travels.

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4. Things 3

Things 3 is a great organisation app that will help young people with intellectual disabilities to get themselves prepared for their work week ahead. The app allows you to create to-do lists for everyday and enter them into a calendar where you will get a notification for a task that needs to be done. What makes this app accessible is that it can be voice controlled for users who have difficulties reading and writing. Organising yourself for work is made very easy through Things 3.

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5. Big Keys Keyboard

Big Keys Keyboard is an ideal app for people who are hard of seeing. The app allows you to add a keyboard to your device that has large and easy to read letters, numbers and emojis. This will make typing more accessible overall which will improve communication.

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6. Voice Dream Reader

Voice Dream Reader is designed for users who struggle to read. It will read documents out that have been taken from PDFs, web browsers and word documents. The app can be individualised for each user based on their needs with assistive tools such as speech rate. This app is great to help users be able to read and understand documents independently!

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7. Choiceworks

Choiceworks is an app designed to help young people create a structured routine in their daily lives from morning, daytime and nighttime. The app uses visual schedules like getting ready for bed or to take a break when they’re feeling overwhelmed or upset. Created with child development specialists and leading hospitals, this app is designed to promote emotional regulation, positive behaviour and independence!

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If you give any of these apps a try let us know what you think! Also if any apps came to mind while you were reading this blog post reach out and let us know through the comments below!

Apps are a great use to gain more independence in everyday life. Through the work we do in Blossom Ireland, we want to ensure that young people with ID learn and develop skills that will elevate them in their journey to young adulthood. Would you be willing to donate to support us on this journey?

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